Natural sensory feedback for phantom limb pain modulation and therapy
Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a frequent consequence of amputation, and it is notoriously difficult to treat. The project seek to challenge the status-quo of phantom limb pain treatment by actively creating meaningful sensory feedback that will restore neuroplastic changes in the cortex and alleviate pain.


Welcome to EPIONE

Amputation of a limb may result from trauma or surgical intervention. The amputation traumatically alters the body image, but often leaves sensations that refer to the missing body part. In 50-80% amputees, neuropathic pain develops, also called phantom limb pain (PLP). Both peripheral and central nervous system factors have been implicated as determinants of PLP. Also, PLP may be triggered by physical (changes in the weather) and psychological factors (emotional stress).

Recent evidence suggests that PLP may be intricately related to neuroplastic changes in the cortex, and that these changes may modulated by providing sensory input to the stump or amputation zone. However, the understanding of why PLP occurs is still poor, the basic research results have not been tested on a large scale in the clinic, and there are no fully effective, long-term treatments readily available on the market.

We aim to challenge the status-quo of PLP therapy by offering technological solutions that will invasively or non-invasively induce natural, meaningful sensations to the amputee to restore the neuroplastic changes in the cortex and thereby control and alleviate PLP. We will assess the effect of cortical neuroplastic, psychological and cognitive components of pain and integrate the knowledge into clinical guidelines.

EPIONE   comes from greek  Ἠπιόνη and is the name of the goddess of the soothing of pain
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This project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 602547.

Papers and Presentations

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